Tuesday, October 5, 2010

Inspiration

Baguette

I was so excited to get a fresh copy of Tartine Bread book, published just last week. While I haven’t gotten to try their recipes, it's undeniably motivated me to bake more and more. This book is not just a cookbook, nor is it just a bread book. The first 37 pages are nothing but stories and pictures. I know you love your iPad/Kindle/e-reader, but Tartine Bread book is the reason why you still want a "real" book. I think trees may even appreciate the beauty of this book, so it’s ok.

Tartine Bread

When I proclaimed my baking challenge about a month ago, I had no idea that this book was on the way to the printing press and I just can’t believe how timely it was. Chad Robertson, who has been obsessed with baking traditional European breads using the slow fermentation method for over 18 years, talks about how Tartine came to be, how he wanted anything but sour bread, and most importantly, he encourages readers (like me) to believe that baking Tartine bread at home is NOT impossible.

Baguette

Baguette

This week, I was working on improving my grigne. Natalie, from Bao Bread, suggested to me over Twitter: “avoid over-rise, little under-rise could help the dough expand in oven and get bigger grin. Adequate heat at bottom can help rise the dough also.” So that’s what I tried.

Baguette

It’s still not perfect, but it certainly did improve. In addition to creating more steam in the oven, I sprayed the dough before putting into the oven. That also seemed to help.

Baguette

Then another problem came. The bottom started to crack. I only wish this was happening on the other side, the top. I don’t know what the solution is other than being more careful with sealing the dough when shaping. I guess I’ll do more research on this. My challenge continues.

Baguette

9 comments:

  1. Looking real good, but why is the bottom of your bread like, ummm say sorta white? After baguettes, where will you go? I mean, what new bread?

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  2. What gorgeous loaves! I'm going to check out that book...

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  3. That crust looks incredible. Love a nice crispy baguette. Beautiful photos.

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  4. Emiko, when you've cracked the code, you need to write a book, sure to be a best seller. Following your trials and tribulations has been fascinating.

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  5. i love a good crusty bread. this looks delicious!

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  6. try a baguette pan i find mine brown all over in that

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  7. Crack or no crack, those are gorgeous loaves. Do you have the recipe posted, or are you waiting until perfection?

    Cheers,

    *Heather*

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  8. cracked bottoms or not, I'm sure these taste better than any store bought baguettes!

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  9. >Jeremy
    Thanks! Yes, I know it's VERY pale. LOL
    I'm not sure if I'm going to turn Kitchen M into a bread blog permanently, but there are plenty of breads to try for sure!

    >Rosa
    Thank you! Yes, check it out! It's a gorgeous book!

    >Trish
    Thanks!

    >OysterCulture
    Hahaha. I think you have a better chance of getting your blog published!

    >Lime Cake
    Thank you!

    >Anonymous
    Thanks for the advice!

    >Squirrelbread
    Hi, Heather! Yes, I'm still waiting for the perfection. But for these loafs, I used the exact same recipe that I posted in the comment of the previous post.

    >Taz
    Thank you! :)

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